Feb 17, 2014
9 notes

fuchifilm:

#5. Idioterne (The Idiots)

Oct 22, 2013
2 notes
No one seemed to understand what we were talking about most of the time. There was no context for them to understand us, other than their fear and incomprehension in the presence of two colored men who were together and not lovers, not bums, not mad. Sometimes, as a joke, I’d wonder aloud to SL if we sounded like this to them: Ooogga booga. Wittgenstein. Mumbo jumbo oogga booga, too, Freud, Djuna Barnes, a hatchi! Mumbo lachiniki jumbo Ishmael Reed and Audrey Hepburn. And because the others couldn’t understand us, meaning was ascribed to us. We couldn’t be trusted. We should see a shrink. We should not spend so much time together; we were only hurting ourselves. We should spend more time in the art world, separately, so that SL could have more of a career as an artist. We should get on with our lives, separately, since there was no such thing as fidelity anymore.
Hilton Als, from the forthcoming White Girls, as excerpted in Guernica
Oct 22, 2013
2 notes
Dona Maria da Assunção had dressed in her Sunday black silk; she was wearing a reddish-blonde wig covered in ornamental black lace; her bony, mittened hands, which lay solemnly on her lap, glittered with rings; a thick gold chain made of filigree hung from the brooch at her neck down to her waist. She was sitting very stiff and erect, her head slightly tilted, her gold-rimmed spectacles perched on her rather equine nose; she had a large, hairy mole on her chin, and whenever she spoke of religious feelings or of miracles she would make an odd movement with her neck and then open her mouth in a silent smile that revealed enormous, greenish teeth, like wedges hammered into her gums. She was a wealthy widow and suffered from chronic catarrh.
Eça de Queirós, from The Crime of Father Amaro (O Crime do Padre Amaro), first published in 1875. How’s that for introducing a character?
Aug 7, 2013
2 notes
Gina Rowlands in Faces (1968)

Gina Rowlands in Faces (1968)

(Source: gosebgo)

Aug 7, 2013
53 notes
Liv Tyler in Stealing Beauty (1996)

Liv Tyler in Stealing Beauty (1996)

(Source: nunooitenaltijd)

Jul 7, 2013
1 note

Hoje que a tarde é calma e o céu tranquilo,

E a noite chega sem que eu saiba bem,

Quero considerar-me e ver aquilo

Que sou, e o que sou o que é que tem.

 

Olho por todo o meu passado e vejo

Que fui quem foi aquilo em torno meu,

Salvo o que o vago e incógnito desejo

De ser eu mesmo de meu ser me deu.

 

Como a páginas já relidas, vergo

Minha atenção sobre quem fui de mim,

E nada de verdade em mim albergo

Salvo uma ânsia sem princípio ou fim.

 

Como alguém distraído na viagem,

Segui por dois caminhos par a par.

Fui com o mundo, parte da paisagem;

Comigo fui, sem ver nem recordar.

 

Chegado aqui, onde hoje estou, conheço

Que sou diverso no que informe estou.

No meu próprio caminho me atravesso.

Não conheço quem fui no que hoje sou.

 

Serei eu, porque nada é impossível,

Vários trazidos de outros mundos, e

No mesmo ponto espacial sensível

Que sou eu, sendo eu por ‘star aqui?

 

Serei eu, porque todo o pensamento

Podendo conceber, bem pode ser,

Um dilatado e múrmuro momento,

De tempos-seres de que sou o viver?

 

—F. Pessoa

Mar 29, 2013
423 notes
theparisreview:

This gallery of images of Paris, then and now, is completely mesmerizing. As they say, it is indeed a time machine.

i dig

theparisreview:

This gallery of images of Paris, then and now, is completely mesmerizing. As they say, it is indeed a time machine.

i dig

Mar 23, 2013
0 notes

From “People’s Park” (2013), a single-shot documentary film made by my friend Libbie and her partner JP. It’s screening at the MoMa this Thursday—go see it if you can! Here’s a NYT write-up for you, too.

Mar 23, 2013
40 notes

kawrage:

Art of Surviving - فن البقاء

This man from the Syrian city of Douma used rockets, cluster bombs, bullets and shells to create musical instruments, stoves, water tanks. 

Speechless

Mar 1, 2013
165 notes
vicemag:

Anonymous Hacked Bank of America and Seemingly Revealed That the Bank’s Spying on Hacktivists
You’ve probably already heard of Anonymous, the world’s most infamous group of cybertrolling hacktivists. They frequently make headlines for crashing websites and looting corporate and government servers. Usually these hacktivists come together in defense of others, such as Julian Assange, the people of Gaza, victims of police brutality, or even victims of rape. But now, Anonymous has turned its eyes on a personal rival. This enemy has its own cybersquad of secret spies who, according to Anonymous, spend the majority of their time in chat rooms collecting intelligence about them. With this latest release of stolen data, Anonymous has just pulled back the curtain on their foe: the Bank of America.
On February 25 @AnonymousIRC, an Anonymous Twitter account with over 280,000 followers, began posting “teasers” about a massive Bank of America data leak. The first post declared, “If you spy on us, we spy on you.” What followed was 14 gigabytes of private emails, spreadsheets, and a “text analysis and data mining” program called OneCalais. The emails in the release originated from “Cyber Threat Intelligence Analysts” who identified themselves as employees of a company called TEKsystems. The TEKsystems website appears to be nothing more than a staffing agency and seems wholesome enough. There’s definitely nothing that screams “we are cyberspies!” It’s safe to assume these analysts were hired by Bank of America, regardless of their TEKsystems titles, because according to the leaked emails that Anonymous released, each of them were using @bankofamerica.com email addresses while filing their reports.
Having a team on staff to protect a corporation from potential cyberthreats is nothing new. This isn’t what caught the attention of Anonymous to begin with; it was the methods being employed by Bank of America to gather data. Each of the 500 plus emails pilfered reads like a surveillance report, most of them reporting on the activities of online activists from Anonymous to Occupy Wall Street.
Continue

vicemag:

Anonymous Hacked Bank of America and Seemingly Revealed That the Bank’s Spying on Hacktivists

You’ve probably already heard of Anonymous, the world’s most infamous group of cybertrolling hacktivists. They frequently make headlines for crashing websites and looting corporate and government servers. Usually these hacktivists come together in defense of others, such as Julian Assange, the people of Gaza, victims of police brutality, or even victims of rape. But now, Anonymous has turned its eyes on a personal rival. This enemy has its own cybersquad of secret spies who, according to Anonymous, spend the majority of their time in chat rooms collecting intelligence about them. With this latest release of stolen data, Anonymous has just pulled back the curtain on their foe: the Bank of America.

On February 25 @AnonymousIRC, an Anonymous Twitter account with over 280,000 followers, began posting “teasers” about a massive Bank of America data leak. The first post declared, “If you spy on us, we spy on you.” What followed was 14 gigabytes of private emails, spreadsheets, and a “text analysis and data mining” program called OneCalais. The emails in the release originated from “Cyber Threat Intelligence Analysts” who identified themselves as employees of a company called TEKsystems. The TEKsystems website appears to be nothing more than a staffing agency and seems wholesome enough. There’s definitely nothing that screams “we are cyberspies!” It’s safe to assume these analysts were hired by Bank of America, regardless of their TEKsystems titles, because according to the leaked emails that Anonymous released, each of them were using @bankofamerica.com email addresses while filing their reports.

Having a team on staff to protect a corporation from potential cyberthreats is nothing new. This isn’t what caught the attention of Anonymous to begin with; it was the methods being employed by Bank of America to gather data. Each of the 500 plus emails pilfered reads like a surveillance report, most of them reporting on the activities of online activists from Anonymous to Occupy Wall Street.

Continue

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